I Jumped Out of an Airplane… Here’s What It Taught Me

The Big Sis Podcast

I Jumped Out of an Airplane… Here’s What It Taught Me

The Big Sis Podcast

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Lessons I Learned On
My Solo Road Trip

I Jumped Out of An Airplane... Here's What It Taught Me

Building a Community with Lizanne Dooner

Breakups Suck,
But You Can Get Through This

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tune into the show on apple podcasts!

I'm Jordi — Writer, speaker, podcaster, and permission slip writer for those who need that lil' nudge to keep writing their stories.

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7. I Jumped Out of An Airplane… Here’s What It Taught Me

Jumping out of an airplane 13,000 feet above the sky was never on my bucket list. But after my engagement ended and my world felt like it was over, I told myself that if I made it to the bottom (in one piece) I was meant to be here.

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Skydiving has never been on my radar, but then it was and I did it. Here’s how it happened.

Before I Jumped

17 days before I jumped out of the airplane my engagement ended. I’ve talked about it before, I’ll talk about it again. It sucked and it was hard to go through— but I definitely skydived because my life had crumbled in front of me.

When I sat down to talk about what I wanted to say about this experience (do I even share this… omg…) This is so embarrassing to admit. But in the Twilight series, Bella starts doing stupid things to remember Edward. And I went through a phase of feeling that way. I’m not impressed now that I’ve said this out loud.

I thought he’d maybe want me back after he saw me going out of my comfort zone (spoiler: he didn’t.) I also told myself that if I made it to the bottom (alive), I was meant to be here. Here being on this Earth.

But I was feeling numb. There’s no other way to describe it.

I broke down and sobbed uncontrollably while cleaning the downstairs bathroom we shared. I was cleaning a drawer out and my back hit the door. I slid down it and sobbed. It was the weirdest feeling in the world to clean out a house that once belonged to you— that you were kicked out of.

After cleaning it out, I went numb.

I tried to convince myself that this was just part of the story. We’d get back together, right? I kind of knew things were over, but I couldn’t believe it. I was just too confused to process anything. So I did what any normal person would do and booked a skydiving jump and a tattoo appointment the day before.

I got tattooed on my arm the song, “Blackbird, fly” which is a Beatles song that has always had meaning to me. I heard it after my assault and it was one of the songs I sang in my head. Years later, the song still have a lot of meaning to me. It represents being brave.

The lyrics, “Blackbird singing in the dead of night, take these broken wings and learn to fly. All your life, you’ve been only waiting for this moment to arise. Blackbird, fly” felt like the perfect way to summarize how I was feeling.

Long story short, I got the ink and survived the jump. But I did learn a few things on the way up and down.

Skydiving 101

I grew up in a town that skydives. It was normal to watch skydivers jump and land in the field adjacent to my elementary school’s playground. I’ve realized in years passing that it’s not normal to watch this as a child. But we’d play games like who could land first? Who would do the most twirls?

I thought I knew skydiving, but until you do it— you don’t.

When you first arrive, you watch a video on safety and risks. You sign paperwork that waives legal rights if you have a serious accident or if you die. That’s when things get serious. I looked at the paper and thought to myself, “I already paid… but do I have to do this?”

Once you agree and sign the paperwork, you get fitted for a suit. I asked for one that would look good in photos because this was my breakup jump. I wanted my ex to see the photos and think I looked good. Ironically, I got the ugliest silver suit they had.

After you get a suit, you wait. And my jump was the last of the night— so everyone that came to support me was waiting and getting cold.

Once my jump was announced, I froze. I was so nervous that I was the last to board. In my head, there was another row and I was convinced they’d go before us. As the plane went higher and higher (13,000 feet to be exact), I saw everything: my childhood home, the restaurant, the house I was just kicked out of, my high school, the hospital, everything. The entire flight was filled with flashbacks and worrying about dying.

Once we got to where we needed to be, I felt clips being attached to me. My instructor started to shove me towards a door. As it turns out, when you’re the last to board, you’re the first to jump. I got shoved out the door and I was free falling for a few seconds.

The instructor kept tapping my arms trying to get me to push my arms out. Once I realized that, the song “Blackbird fly” started playing. And in a weird metaphorical way, my wings opened. That feeling of free falling quickly turned to panic as I realized there wasn’t a parachute yet. When the ripcord was pulled and it opened, I realized in that moment I was going to make it.

Here’s what I learned, let’s jump in (pun intended):

Do It Scared

I didn’t want to jump. I was terrified to get a tattoo. I didn’t want to jump, but I wanted to feel something. Had I not chased after that, I wouldn’t have experienced the catapulting experience that pushed me into the next chapter of my life.

Skydiving was monumental and cathartic. I got out of my own head, got out of preconceived notions that I had about spending the rest of my life with the person who no longer wanted me. Had I not jumped, I don’t think I’d be where I am now.

In the moments leading up to jumping, I had lost my sense of self, my identity, my home, everything that made me Jordi Tiffany. I thought to myself, “I have nothing to lose.”I knew in that moment if I didn’t jump, I would be miserable forever. Pushing past your fear is the best thing you can do.

The greatest things in life are on the other side of fear.

—Will Smith

Have Faith

My faith is a huge part of my story and getting through everything from childhood on. But faith for me in this story was trusting the pilot. I had to trust somebody to get me where I needed to be. I had to trust my parachute. I was pushed out of the airplane, but the parachute still needed to work. I had to trust myself.

There’s a quote about jumping and hoping the parachute opens on the way down is so true. The best things happen when you have faith, trust your gut, and do it scared.

Life (and everything in general!) is All About Perspective

I remember looking up at the sky when I was little and thinking how crazy those people were to want to jump out of an airplane. I had so many experiences in the small town I lived in: heartbreak, things that a child shouldn’t face. I thought those problems were so big.

But to be in the airplane and be above all of the place that were so engrained in me that was my identity— my perspective shifted. It was the biggest release of hurt, frustration, and confusion I had ever experienced. It was the moment I realized I was about to start living my best life.

One little thing (or a big thing for me) was all I needed to realize that everything that had been said to me or done to me— I got to decide how it would dictate my future. Everything was now my decision.

October 3, 2020 — Journal Entry (Post-Skydiving)

I survived. 

I flew in an airplane 13,000 feet above the place that’s made me feel trapped for the majority of my life. 

A town full of people who didn’t care that I was a child. Rather– that I was sick. I rose above them. 

A relationship built on ultimatums, caveats, and demands. I ascended beyond the rejection and hurt. 

As the plane crept higher and higher, towering over the city limits that held me captive for as long as I can remember, the brokenness inside of me started mending. 

The weight I’ve carried fell off as we rose. 

I looked out the window, waved goodbye to the past, and swallowed my fear. 

Fear that I wasn’t worthy of being loved. That self-love was a radical idea that didn’t exist in this dimension. That the zip code I’ve known for so long was my final destination. 

As we got to the “top”, I told myself that all I needed was one second of insane courage. 

By the time my brain had formulated the thought, I was shoved outside of my safety and comfort. I remembered my new ink and internally sang, “blackbird, fly” as I descended down to my new life he freed me to live. 

There Will Always Be Big, Scary Moments

You don’t have to jump out of an airplane for this to make sense. There will always be moments that are big, scary, and make your gut drop. But those are the moments that you need to chase after. Going to the college across the country, loving who you love, or being true to who you are. There’s so much pressure. If there’s anything I’ve learned since jumping out of an airplane, it’s that we get to decide who we are.

That might mean getting rid of people who don’t cheer for you at the bottom (after skydiving!) If people cheer you on when you hit rock bottom— they’re not your people. There will always be moments that feel like you’re jumping out of an airplane. My advice is to go after it. If you trust your gut and have faith in doing it— you’re so much braver than you give yourself credit for. You are here for a reason and I truly think it’s our responsibility to chase our own happiness. For me it was skydiving and restarting my life, but for you it might be something smaller.

That doesn’t mean it’s insignificant, it just means it’s the first step closer to the next big thing.

tl;dr I jumped out of an airplane and learned that all you need is to do it scared, have faith, and your perspective might change. And that’s a good thing.

7. I Jumped Out of An Airplane… Here’s What It Taught Me

Jumping out of an airplane 13,000 feet above the sky was never on my bucket list. But after my engagement ended and my world felt like it was over, I told myself that if I made it to the bottom (in one piece) I was meant to be here.

LISTEN ON YOUR FAVE PLATFORM: APPLE PODCASTS | SPOTIFY

Skydiving has never been on my radar, but then it was and I did it. Here’s how it happened.

Before I Jumped

17 days before I jumped out of the airplane my engagement ended. I’ve talked about it before, I’ll talk about it again. It sucked and it was hard to go through— but I definitely skydived because my life had crumbled in front of me.

When I sat down to talk about what I wanted to say about this experience (do I even share this… omg…) This is so embarrassing to admit. But in the Twilight series, Bella starts doing stupid things to remember Edward. And I went through a phase of feeling that way. I’m not impressed now that I’ve said this out loud.

I thought he’d maybe want me back after he saw me going out of my comfort zone (spoiler: he didn’t.) I also told myself that if I made it to the bottom (alive), I was meant to be here. Here being on this Earth.

But I was feeling numb. There’s no other way to describe it.

I broke down and sobbed uncontrollably while cleaning the downstairs bathroom we shared. I was cleaning a drawer out and my back hit the door. I slid down it and sobbed. It was the weirdest feeling in the world to clean out a house that once belonged to you— that you were kicked out of.

After cleaning it out, I went numb.

I tried to convince myself that this was just part of the story. We’d get back together, right? I kind of knew things were over, but I couldn’t believe it. I was just too confused to process anything. So I did what any normal person would do and booked a skydiving jump and a tattoo appointment the day before.

I got tattooed on my arm the song, “Blackbird, fly” which is a Beatles song that has always had meaning to me. I heard it after my assault and it was one of the songs I sang in my head. Years later, the song still have a lot of meaning to me. It represents being brave.

The lyrics, “Blackbird singing in the dead of night, take these broken wings and learn to fly. All your life, you’ve been only waiting for this moment to arise. Blackbird, fly” felt like the perfect way to summarize how I was feeling.

Long story short, I got the ink and survived the jump. But I did learn a few things on the way up and down.

Skydiving 101

I grew up in a town that skydives. It was normal to watch skydivers jump and land in the field adjacent to my elementary school’s playground. I’ve realized in years passing that it’s not normal to watch this as a child. But we’d play games like who could land first? Who would do the most twirls?

I thought I knew skydiving, but until you do it— you don’t.

When you first arrive, you watch a video on safety and risks. You sign paperwork that waives legal rights if you have a serious accident or if you die. That’s when things get serious. I looked at the paper and thought to myself, “I already paid… but do I have to do this?”

Once you agree and sign the paperwork, you get fitted for a suit. I asked for one that would look good in photos because this was my breakup jump. I wanted my ex to see the photos and think I looked good. Ironically, I got the ugliest silver suit they had.

After you get a suit, you wait. And my jump was the last of the night— so everyone that came to support me was waiting and getting cold.

Once my jump was announced, I froze. I was so nervous that I was the last to board. In my head, there was another row and I was convinced they’d go before us. As the plane went higher and higher (13,000 feet to be exact), I saw everything: my childhood home, the restaurant, the house I was just kicked out of, my high school, the hospital, everything. The entire flight was filled with flashbacks and worrying about dying.

Once we got to where we needed to be, I felt clips being attached to me. My instructor started to shove me towards a door. As it turns out, when you’re the last to board, you’re the first to jump. I got shoved out the door and I was free falling for a few seconds.

The instructor kept tapping my arms trying to get me to push my arms out. Once I realized that, the song “Blackbird fly” started playing. And in a weird metaphorical way, my wings opened. That feeling of free falling quickly turned to panic as I realized there wasn’t a parachute yet. When the ripcord was pulled and it opened, I realized in that moment I was going to make it.

Here’s what I learned, let’s jump in (pun intended):

Do It Scared

I didn’t want to jump. I was terrified to get a tattoo. I didn’t want to jump, but I wanted to feel something. Had I not chased after that, I wouldn’t have experienced the catapulting experience that pushed me into the next chapter of my life.

Skydiving was monumental and cathartic. I got out of my own head, got out of preconceived notions that I had about spending the rest of my life with the person who no longer wanted me. Had I not jumped, I don’t think I’d be where I am now.

In the moments leading up to jumping, I had lost my sense of self, my identity, my home, everything that made me Jordi Tiffany. I thought to myself, “I have nothing to lose.”I knew in that moment if I didn’t jump, I would be miserable forever. Pushing past your fear is the best thing you can do.

The greatest things in life are on the other side of fear.

—Will Smith

Have Faith

My faith is a huge part of my story and getting through everything from childhood on. But faith for me in this story was trusting the pilot. I had to trust somebody to get me where I needed to be. I had to trust my parachute. I was pushed out of the airplane, but the parachute still needed to work. I had to trust myself.

There’s a quote about jumping and hoping the parachute opens on the way down is so true. The best things happen when you have faith, trust your gut, and do it scared.

Life (and everything in general!) is All About Perspective

I remember looking up at the sky when I was little and thinking how crazy those people were to want to jump out of an airplane. I had so many experiences in the small town I lived in: heartbreak, things that a child shouldn’t face. I thought those problems were so big.

But to be in the airplane and be above all of the place that were so engrained in me that was my identity— my perspective shifted. It was the biggest release of hurt, frustration, and confusion I had ever experienced. It was the moment I realized I was about to start living my best life.

One little thing (or a big thing for me) was all I needed to realize that everything that had been said to me or done to me— I got to decide how it would dictate my future. Everything was now my decision.

October 3, 2020 — Journal Entry (Post-Skydiving)

I survived. 

I flew in an airplane 13,000 feet above the place that’s made me feel trapped for the majority of my life. 

A town full of people who didn’t care that I was a child. Rather– that I was sick. I rose above them. 

A relationship built on ultimatums, caveats, and demands. I ascended beyond the rejection and hurt. 

As the plane crept higher and higher, towering over the city limits that held me captive for as long as I can remember, the brokenness inside of me started mending. 

The weight I’ve carried fell off as we rose. 

I looked out the window, waved goodbye to the past, and swallowed my fear. 

Fear that I wasn’t worthy of being loved. That self-love was a radical idea that didn’t exist in this dimension. That the zip code I’ve known for so long was my final destination. 

As we got to the “top”, I told myself that all I needed was one second of insane courage. 

By the time my brain had formulated the thought, I was shoved outside of my safety and comfort. I remembered my new ink and internally sang, “blackbird, fly” as I descended down to my new life he freed me to live. 

There Will Always Be Big, Scary Moments

You don’t have to jump out of an airplane for this to make sense. There will always be moments that are big, scary, and make your gut drop. But those are the moments that you need to chase after. Going to the college across the country, loving who you love, or being true to who you are. There’s so much pressure. If there’s anything I’ve learned since jumping out of an airplane, it’s that we get to decide who we are.

That might mean getting rid of people who don’t cheer for you at the bottom (after skydiving!) If people cheer you on when you hit rock bottom— they’re not your people. There will always be moments that feel like you’re jumping out of an airplane. My advice is to go after it. If you trust your gut and have faith in doing it— you’re so much braver than you give yourself credit for. You are here for a reason and I truly think it’s our responsibility to chase our own happiness. For me it was skydiving and restarting my life, but for you it might be something smaller.

That doesn’t mean it’s insignificant, it just means it’s the first step closer to the next big thing.

tl;dr I jumped out of an airplane and learned that all you need is to do it scared, have faith, and your perspective might change. And that’s a good thing.

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Listen to the Show

My Story

work with me

Join the Community

podcast episodes

top downloaded

tune into the show on apple podcasts!

I'm Jordi — Writer, speaker, podcaster, and permission slip writer for those who need that lil' nudge to keep writing their stories.

Lessons I Learned On
My Solo Road Trip

I Jumped Out of An Airplane... Here's What It Taught Me

Building a Community with Lizanne Dooner

Breakups Suck,
But You Can Get Through This

search our show notes!

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